Doughnuts And Beer Returns To Lowercase Brewing

Craft beer and food pairings are everywhere these days, as they should be.  I’m glad we’re finally starting to reach the point where pairing great craft beers with great food is nearly as ubiquitous (at least here in the Northwest) as pairing wine with food.  In fact, I think that the range and diversity of craft beer styles offers even more exciting food pairing options than wine.

Beer and food parings are serious business.  In fact, next month during Seattle Beer Week, you’re sure to find some pretty amazing craft beer pairing dinners/events.  Not all pairings have to be so serious though. Perhaps you’ve read one of the recent articles about pairing craft beers with Girl Scout cookies?  It’s in that vein that Lowercase Brewing Company, along with their sister company Side Hustle Coffee & Doughnuts, are pleased to announce the return of their Doughnuts and Beer pairing event this Wednesday, April 18th from 6-9 pm.

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Bacon, Eggs & Kegs Returns To CenturyLink Field Next Week

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Brunch at CenturyLink, featuring bacon, cocktails, floats, fun and games and a huge beer lineup?  Yes please!  Seattle’s largest, locally produced brunch event, Bacon, Eggs & Kegs is returning for its third and biggest event next Saturday and Sunday, August 27-28 at CenturyLink Field from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.  

This over-the-top event will feature tastings from 30+ local breweries and cideries, boozy root beer floats, a 30-foot Bloody Mary bar with vodkas by Heritage Distilling Co., an Irish coffee bar, bacon butchery demos by Heritage Meats, 20+ local restaurants and chefs serving bacon and egg focused dishes, putt putt golf and duffleboard by Flatstick Pub, bacon bingo, dueling pianos, and much more.

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Mixing It Up With Your Beers

Do you ever mix your beers?  Now, to be clear, I’m not referring to the trend of beer cocktails you may have seen from the likes of Brewing Up Cocktails.  I’m referring to the practice of mixing two more more beers together in the same glass.  Most craft beer drinkers I know have, to my knowledge, never actually tried this practice (other than perhaps a black and tan), but it can yield some interesting results. 

The most common ‘mixed’ beer drink, and possibly the oldest, is probably a black and tan.  It’s created when a stout and a pale ale or pale lager are mixed in a attractive, two-tiered pour in a single glass.  The earliest recorded usage of the term in the Oxford English Dictionary is from 1889.  Although, when a black and tan is poured properly, technically speaking it isn’t a ‘mixed’ beer since the stout and the pale ale or pale lager are kept separate in the glass – with the stout floating on top of the ale or lager.  This is done using careful pouring over the back of a spoon or a Black and Tan Turtle.  There are several different variations on the style, but the most common is still stout mixed with pale ale or lager. 

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